Some “Christmas Songs” should be all the time Songs

Some “Christmas Songs” should be all the time Songs

Some “Christmas Songs” should be all the time Songs

We thankfully don’t limit songs that refer to the cross or the resurrection to Easter. So why do we limit songs about Christ’s advent and incarnation to the Christmas season?

Jesus’ coming and incarnation are not just relevant in December. Those profound truths are relevant in the summer too.

The word “Christmas” comes from what the day, December 25th, was set apart to do. It was set apart to be a “mass on Christ’s day.” That is, Christmas was a day designated to celebrate and contemplate Christ’s coming and why He came.

Christmas certainly has a worthy goal. Just as Easter (Resurrection Sunday!) is a special day set apart on the Lord’s day to especially celebrate Christ’s resurrection. We, however, can rightly remember Jesus’ resurrection every Sunday/Lord’s Day, indeed every day!

I am convinced certain “Christmas songs” should be more common throughout the year. Perhaps we should rename Christmas songs “Advent” or “Incarnation” songs. For that is what they’re about.

They are not about the hustle and bustle of the season. They have nothing really to do with red and green or Santa or reindeer or snow. But, Christ’s advent and incarnation have to do with everything because they affect everything.

We are amiss when we miss the relevance of Christ’s coming and incarnation in the spring, summer, and fall. Songs are partly meant to be sung to help us recall what we should never forget. They are a trumpet blast to our lousy memories.

So, some “Christmas songs” should be all the time songs.

Here are fives Advent/Incarnation songs we should sing year round:

   1. “O Come O Come Emmanuel

Here’s why we should sing this song all year long: the song is great lyrically and musically. The lyrics might be a little archaic at points but it’s worth putting in the work to understand.

O come, Thou Rod of Jesse, free
Thine own from Satan’s tyranny;
From depths of hell Thy people save,
And give them victory o’er the grave.
Rejoice! Rejoice! Emmanuel
Shall come to thee, O Israel.
.

“Thou Rod of Jesse” refers to Jesus the Promised One. He is the one that brings victory from Satan’s plots. So, we can and should rejoice because Emmanuel (which means God with us) has come.

   2. “O Holy Night

Long lay the world in sin and ever pining
‘Til he appeared and the soul felt its worth
A thrill of hope, the weary world rejoices…
Chains shall He break for the slave is our brother
And in His name all oppression shall cease
.

How could you not appreciate those lines? And I don’t think those lines are just powerful during the Christmas holiday.

   3. “Hark! The Herald Angels Sing

   4. “Come, Thou Long Expected Jesus

   5. “Joy to the World

*Photo by David Beale

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